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Archives for posts tagged ‘bigelow’

Start and Finish A Meal with Bigelow Green Tea

bigelow tea green tea with lemon

Bigelow Tea has spent over 70 years developing and perfecting some of America’s favorite tea blends. These multidimensional flavors are delicious on their own, but can be further enhanced when paired with the right foods! You’ve heard of tea and scones, but have you ever considered pairing Bigelow Green Tea with steamed shellfish? It’s a big yes!

bigelow tea green tea classic

Bigelow Green Tea is delicate, smooth, and mellow on the palate. Facebook fan Nickolette Simmons says “a day without green tea is a day without sunshine” and we couldn’t agree more! Its clean notes of green melon and grass pair well with lighter dishes such as Steamed Clams in Lemon-Garlic Broth (pictured below). This flavorful dish is prepared with Bigelow I Love Lemon, an invigorating blend of lemon and lemongrass, meaning double the Bigelow Tea in this perfect pair!

bigelow tea tea recipe

Another go-to pairing for Green Tea is a good veggie dish. Bigelow’s Green Tea Ramen Soup uses Bigelow Green Tea to create a warm, comforting broth. Pair this with a hot cuppa Bigelow Green Tea and say hello to the ultimate cold and flu fighter!

If Green is your favorite cuppa Bigelow, try one of these pairing tips next cup you steep!

Dive Into History With An Ancient Book And Bigelow Tea

bigelow tea book

There’s nothing quite like enjoying a cup of Bigelow Tea while reading a classic. And a book that is over 800 years old is definitely a classic—especially one about something as timeless as tea. Grab a mug of your favorite Bigelow flavor, settle in and learn about one of the oldest books about tea. According to the book, it is the “elixir of life,” after all…

Long ago—in 1211 to be exact—a famous Buddhist priest by the name of Eisai wrote what is known to be the oldest book on tea in Japan: Kissa Yojoki (“How to Stay Healthy by Drinking Tea”). Prior to writing the two-volume book, Eisai had brought tea seeds from China to Kyoto in 1191 and had given the seeds to a priest named Myoe Shopin, who made them into Uji tea.

The book begins by saying, “Tea is the ultimate mental and medical remedy, and has the ability to make one’s life more full and complete,” and outlines the positive effects that tea has on the vital organs, particularly the heart. It praises the value of tea as a medicine in curing indigestion, quenching thirst, avoiding fatigue, working as a stimulant, undoing the effects of alcohol, and improving brain and urinary function. The book also explains the parts of the tea plant and the appropriate dosages and administration for specific ailments.

In 1214, legend holds that Eisai introduced tea to the Samurai in an effort to help Shogun Minmoto no Sanetomo curb his alcohol habit. Armed with his writings on the benefits of drinking tea, Eisai allegedly helped to wean Saneomo from imbibing alcohol to drinking tea. Following that, tea drinking became popular among the Shogun and the Samurai.

Whether you’re craving a taste of history or want to spend the evening in with a book and a mug of tea like @Glam_Butterfly, Bigelow Tea is a great way to carry on the tradition of tea-drinking that stretches back centuries and across the globe!

Image via Flickr by A Girl With Tea

Let Bigelow Tea Know: Where Is Your Favorite Place To Sip Tea During The Year?

bigelow tea mug

Spring, summer, fall, and winter… the Bigelow Tea family knows each season provides a special reason for pouring that perfect cup or glass of tea. Of course, it could be argued that any time of the year is great for sipping on your favorite Bigelow Tea type. Yet, if a choice must be made, let’s consider these four scenarios: would it involve cooling off with a glass of iced tea on a warm summer day or perhaps savoring green tea indoors on a rainy spring day? Sitting by the fire with a mug of hot black tea on a cold winter’s night sounds appealing like Instagrammer @mrsjensclark’s steaming cup of Bigelow’s French Vanilla. So does brewing a seasonal flavor while watching the autumn leaves come down off their trees!

Each season certainly offers the opportunity to sip your favorite Bigelow Tea flavor. Let Bigelow Tea know when and where you’re mostly likely to be found enjoying a cup by completing the survey below:

Bigelow Tea Fan Kristy Shares How To Start A Tea Bag Garden

bigelow tea garden

At Bigelow Tea, we are big fans of composting, so we get super excited when a tea fan shares a new composting tip, especially when it involves used Bigelow tea bags.  Meet fan Kristy as she shares her family story, the how-tos and pictures on starting a tea bag garden:

You can start a garden easily and with very little expense using tea bags.  When I was growing up, my family would go to Puerto Rico every year for spring break.  It was there, visiting my grandmother (Abuela), that I first learned about tea bag gardening. 

My grandmother always served tea in the evening and collected our used tea bags in a glass jar.  At the time, being about 6 years old, I thought this was an odd practice, so I asked her why she was saving our old tea bags and she said that she would show me in the morning.  The next morning, my grandmother passed on the steps that I will now share with you. 

 

How To Start A Tea Bag Garden

You will need:

  • Disposable serving tray
  • Seeds of your choice
  • Used Bigelow tea bags-any flavor –minus the staple
  • Unbleached paper towels
  • Watering pitcher
  • Small blade/knife (optional)

Step by step instructions:

  1. Begin with a plate, platter or disposable serving tray (found at any Dollar Store).
  1. Line your tray with unbleached paper towels.  Use unbleached paper towels to avoid chemical leaching.
  1. Prepare your fresh tea bags (prepare normally using boiling water from your kettle) or take your collection of used tea bags and moisten them in water.bigelow tea tea garden
  1. Place your moistened tea bags on your tray.  Be sure to allow space between the bags.
  1. Next, using a small blade/knife or your fingers, make a small slit in the tea bags (large enough to plant your seeds).
  1. Now, take 2-3 seeds and push them into the slit that you made in the tea bag so that the seeds are slightly covered by the tea leaves.  Note that because the tea leaves are moist, some of the contents of the tea bag will get on your fingers but be patient and continue to make sure that the seed is indeed in place.
  1. Take your watering pitcher and pour water onto the paper towels-NOT directly onto the teabags.bigelow tea tea bags garden
  1. Now place your tea bag garden in a sunny area and wait for your seeds to sprout.  Be sure to keep the paper towels moistened and depending on sun exposure, temperature and watering, seeds should begin to sprout in 10-15 days.  Note that some seeds do take longer to germinate so don’t give up!
  1. Once you have a small sprout, take the ENTIRE tea bag and plant it in your garden which can be a raised bed or container.   And no worries about doing this because the tea bag that you used as a planter/seed starter is great compost for your garden.

 

As an adult and an avid gardener, I now know that this is a great way to begin your garden as there is less shock to your seedling because you don’t have to remove it from the tea bag. 

I am so happy to pass along my grandmother’s garden/tea tip.  Happy tea drinking and good luck with this season’s garden!

 

Kristy from Shelton, CT
Bigelow Tea Fan

Bigelow Tea Is Gushing Over Charleston Tea Plantation’s First Flush

bigelow tea charleston tea plantaion

Nothing excites Bigelow Tea more than seeing new growth, especially at the Charleston Tea Plantation! Every spring, their Camellia Sinensis plants reawaken from a winter slumber with a fresh batch of tea leaves known collectively as the First Flush. What makes this First Flush special is that these pristine leaves become the basis for First Flush Tea, a limited edition and unique tea traditionally reserved only for Royalty. And make note, this tea sells out quickly because it’s only around once every season.

bigelow tea charleston tea plantation blends

Of course, there’s always time to visit the Charleston Tea Plantation. Based on Wadmalaw Island, in South Carolina’s Lowcountry, Bigelow Tea fans can learn how various tea blends like American Classic Tea are produced here by going on free daily factory tours where Bigelow’s manufacturing process from crop to cup is explained and you learn about the differences in the production of greenblack and Oolong teas among other tea points of interest. Plus while you’re here, you can explore the grounds of America’s largest tea garden by buying a ticket and hopping on a trolley tour. Keep your phone out to snap some scenic pics like this great shot that Merydie Ross posted on her Instagram. And don’t forget to purchase some tea before heading home so you can have a little bit of Charleston in your cupboard.  Enjoy and happy spring!

Go, Girl! Make Bigelow Tea A Part Of National Women’s Health Week

It’s never too early or too late to work toward a healthier lifestyle. And no matter what type of health routine you subscribe to—be it physical, mental or spiritual—you can always complement it with Bigelow Tea. If you’re not already carving a few minutes out of your day to enjoy a cup, National Women’s Health Week is a great time to start.

Check out our video as president and CEO Cindi Bigelow shares fun facts about tea and describes how Bigelow Tea ties perfectly into a healthy lifestyle. For instance, a Columbia University study showed that the polyphenols known as EGCG in green tea reduce the chance of cancer, and a Harvard University study suggested that black tea may reduce the chance of a stroke or heart attack by 45 percent. Wow! Talk about being steeped in health benefits!

Whatever you choose to do to improve your personal well-being, the vibrant flavors and natural ingredients of Bigelow Tea make a perfect pairing for healthy living.

Bigelow Tea Discusses The Importance Of Celiac Disease Awareness

With more than 130 distinct flavors, Bigelow Tea takes pride in giving you that perfect cup. And that means offering options to the tea lovers that may have dietary sensitivities or conditions, too.

Take Celiac disease as an example.

bigelow tea constant comment celiac awareness

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder caused by an intolerance to gluten, a protein found only in these grains: barley, rye, oats and wheat. When someone with Celiac disease ingests gluten, it can lead to damage of the small intestine. According to the Celiac Disease Foundation, it is estimated that 1 in 100 people worldwide are affected, and two and one-half million Americans are undiagnosed and are at risk for long-term health complications. Thankfully, awareness is growing about gluten sensitivity and gluten intolerance.

While tea is a naturally gluten-free beverage, sometimes a tea or an herbal tea may contain a small amount of gluten-containing grain as an ingredient. If you have concerns about gluten, here’s some good news! Most Bigelow teas are formulated to be gluten-free, and each gluten-free flavor is clearly labeled on the box. On the Bigelow Tea website, you can find a section that lists all gluten-free teas—you’ll also see gluten-free recipes to bring to the table. Grab your favorite Bigelow Tea flavor (@jenluvdonut loves Earl Grey) and let’s raise a cup to promoting Celiac disease awareness!

Bigelow Tea Adds More Green To Spring Up Our Garmugia Recipe

bigelow tea recipe

Bigelow Tea’s love for greens (which in this case includes not only tea but vegetables too!) is shared with this different take on Garmugia, a spring vegetable soup, featuring Bigelow Green Tea with Lemon as a zesty ingredient.

While Bigelow Tea, a family-run, third-generation company, has been in business for over 70 years, this traditional Italian dish has a longer history dating  back to the 16th or 17th century and is traced to the Tuscan city of Lucca where the soup was made with the vegetables harvested in the spring. Historically Garmugia included a medley of vegetables, bits of meat, and pieces of bread blended and slow cooked to perfection. Our version is very similar except the chef can find the ingredients in the grocery store and it can be ready to eat much faster, thankfully.  And we think our addition of Bigelow Green Tea with Lemon will make it even more enjoyable than the 17th century version!

Turn up the green this spring – give this recipe a try and let us know what you think by leaving a comment here or by writing a review here. We hope it makes your next dinner gathering or comfort food at home simply delish!

bigelow tea green tea with lemon

Garmugia (Spring Vegetable Soup)

40 Minutes, Serves 8

Ingredients

  • 20 Bigelow Green Tea with Lemon Tea Bags
  • 7 cups (1 ¾L) boiling water
  • 3 tablespoons (45mL) extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 fresh Italian sausage, casing removed and meat crumbled
  • 3 small white onions, thinly sliced
  • 3 oz. (90g) ground beef
  • ½ cup (125mL) frozen lima beans or frozen fava beans
  • ½ cup (125mL) frozen peas
  • ½ cup (125mL) asparagus tips
  • ½ teaspoon (2.5mL) salt
  • ½ teaspoon (2.5mL) freshly ground pepper

Croutons:

  • ¼ cup (60mL) extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 4 slices coarse white bread, cut into ½ inch cubes
  • 1 tablespoon (15mL) Italian parsley, chopped

Instructions

Place Bigelow Green Tea with Lemon tea bags into a large bowl; pour 7 cups boiling water over the tea bags. Let steep for 5 minutes. Remove tea bags, squeeze well and set aside. In a large saucepan over medium heat, warm the olive oil. Add the sausage meat, onions and ground beef; sauté until meat browns and onions turn opaque. Add the beans, peas and asparagus and stir well. Pour in reserved tea, cover and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and cook covered until the flavors are blended, about 30 minutes, skimming off any froth from the surface of the soup. Halfway through the cooking time, season with salt and pepper. Serve. To prepare the croutons, add olive oil to frying pan and heat over medium high heat. Add the garlic and sauté until it begins to turn golden. Remove garlic and add bread cubes and stir until golden brown on all sides, about 4 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the crouton to paper towels to drain. Sprinkle with parsley. Ladle hot soup into warmed soup bowls and garnish with croutons.

Bigelow Tea Gets A Kick Out Of Cristiano Ronaldo’s Latest Tea-Drinking Adventure

If you follow soccer, then the name Cristiano Ronaldo sounds awfully familiar. One of the most famous professional soccer players in the world, the Real Madrid C.F. and Portuguese National Team player has set multiple records on the field. Off the field, Cristiano is no stranger to fame and is known as someone who loves to have a good laugh (which Bigelow Tea can certainly appreciate).

As you can imagine, life as a famous athlete is no doubt a hectic one. And Cristiano proved just that when he had a little fun by recording how many times he was interrupted with requests for pictures while drinking tea at a café with a friend. Within a few minutes, Cristiano posed dozens of times with fans while sipping. Whew… what an adventure it is to be such a high-profile celebrity! At least he was a good sport about it—with a cup of chamomile tea in hand, no less!

Take Your Pick Of Bigelow Teas From The Camellia Sinensis Plant

bigelow tea plantWhen it comes to multitasking, it’s tough to top the camellia sinensis plant. This mighty bush is the single source for three types of tea offered by Bigelow Tea: black, green and oolong! How long the newly plucked leaves are fermented (exposed to air) determines the final tea variety. Third-generation President and CEO Cindi Bigelow shares more fun facts about the process in this video.

Regardless of which type of tea you prefer, rest assured that Bigelow Tea takes great care to work with the world’s best growers and suppliers of each one. Here’s a closer look at how your favorite brew makes the delicious transition from crop to cup:

  • Blackgreen and oolong teas all begin with the top two leaves in a bud plucked from a camellia sinensis plant.
  • Leaves destined to be black teas are immediately exposed to air for six to eight hours, dried and then chopped. Bigelow Tea’s black teas are sourced primarily from high-elevation gardens in Sri Lanka and India that adhere to the highest standards for quality and growing practices set by the Ethical Tea Partnership.
  • Green teas are unfermented, which means they are steamed or pan-fried without being exposed to air, then dried and chopped.
  • Oolong teas are partially fermented by being exposed to air for about three hours.
  • Herbal “teas” blend fruits, herbs and spices but do not contain actual tea leaves.

So go ahead – take your pick from Bigelow Tea’s 130+ varieties (check out Twitter fan @tiredapplestar‘s drawer full of choices!) – and enjoy the purity in every sip, along with new-found knowledge about the plant that makes tea possible!